‘Lovecraft audio before digital': additions

Additions to the ‘Lovecraft audio before digital’ gallery post. Many thanks to Dennis Weiler of Fedogan, for sending me more cover art from Lovecraft audio cassettes. Dennis writes of them…

“Our “Fungi From Yuggoth” is on [picture] 01, initially released in 1987 on cassette alone. As far as I know, it was the first HPL poetry recording ever released for sale. All of these J-cards are from cassettes in my possession. The R.M. Price recording is marked 1997, but I’ve no idea whether digital-format was released. It was a Necronomicon Press production, I think.”

J-cards 3 001

J-cards 4 001

J-cards 2 001

J-cards 1 001

“Strange and spacious realms”

It appears I was correct about George Fitzpatrick, an Australian Lovecraft correspondent (see my Historical Context #4 and also Lovecraft Annual 2013). Dr. Brendan Whyte, Assistant Curator of Maps at the National Library of Australia, kindly asked a Dr. Martin Woods to take a look into the Fitzpatrick bookplate collection and seek out the Lovecraft bookplate. He found it…

“I instructed him to see if the HPL bookplate was in the Fitzpatrick collection, and indeed it is. Attached are photos of it and the card to which Fitzpatrick attached it. The verso of the card, presumably typed (rather poorly) by Fitzpatrick from notes sent by Lovecraft, reads:

GENESIS.

The georgian doorway with a suggestion of a tall flight of outside steps, serves a three-fold symbolic purpose. 1. The doorway quality of all books, whereby they serve to admit the reader to strange and spacious realms. 2. It typifies the urban scene in which he has spent his life, the quaint hill streets of Old Providence scarcely changed in a century and a half, 3- symbolises his personal antiquarian tastes.

ARTIST. Wilfred Blanch Tolman.”

A note in pencil on the side states: “Don[or]. Mrs G. Fitzpatrick. 7.12.[19]49″

I would agree that the typed card must be Fitzpatrick’s summary of a Lovecraft letter which had accompanied the bookplate to Australia, and which had been discarded. The words “The doorway quality of all books, whereby they serve to admit the reader to strange and spacious realms.” certainly sound like they could be Lovecraft’s own.

070

069

072

073

One wonders if this was the limit of the correspondence, or if there were later letters between the two men?

Forthcoming, the Bloch-Lovecraft letters

News of a new book of Lovecraft letters, from S.T. Joshi

David E. Schultz and I are working hard on getting Lovecraft’s Letters to Robert Bloch ready for publication with Hippocampus Press. It will also include letters to Natalie H. Wooley, Robert Nelson, William Frederick Anger, Kenneth Sterling, Donald A. Wollheim, Wilson Shepherd, and Willis Conover. A fat book! This could be published as early as February 2015. After that — the joint correspondence of Lovecraft and Clark Ashton Smith!”

* Robert Nelson (1912-1935) isn’t in The Lovecraft Encyclopaedia. But there is information here. The blurb for a 2012 book collection of his work, Sable Revery: Poems, Sketches and Letters, gives a biographical outline…

Robert Nelson (1912-1935) was a contributor of verse to Weird Tales magazine in the mid-1930s, and of verse and prose to fan magazines like The Fantasy Fan. He was also a correspondent of H.P. Lovecraft and Clark Ashton Smith. … Also included [in the book] are five [1930s] letters by H.P. Lovecraft”

* Natalie Hartley Wooley corresponded 1933–37. She was a poet of the amateur journalism movement, with poetry in The Tryout and probably other amateur journals. She also had poetry and at least one “straight ghost story” in The Fantasy Fan, plus a lead essay on “The Adventure Story” in The Californian (Fall 1935) which had an early critical appraisal of a Conan story. Lovecraft’s letters to her appear to have had much to say on race relations, pungent extracts from which have already been published in Selected Letters.

* Wilson Shepherd was a friend of Wollheim, publishing the forerunner (Fanciful Tales?) to The Phantagraph. He corresponded 1936-37, and Lovecraft revised a couple of his poems. He published “A History of the Necronomicon” in pamphlet form in 1937.

Lovecraft on LP and cassette

Lovecraft in audio, before digital…

audiobooks-haunter-of-the-dark-rats

CAEDMONTheDunwichHorror500

ARTCTheRatsInTheWalls500

lovecraft_lp_1975

star23

h_p_lovecraft_the_rats_in_the_walls

cover1

UPDATE: Additions to the ‘Lovecraft audio before digital’ gallery post. Many thanks to Dennis Weiler of Fedogan, for sending me more cover art from Lovecraft audio cassettes. Dennis writes of them…

“Our “Fungi From Yuggoth” is on [picture] 01, initially released in 1987 on cassette alone. As far as I know, it was the first HPL poetry recording ever released for sale. All of these J-cards are from cassettes in my possession. The R.M. Price recording is marked 1997, but I’ve no idea whether digital-format was released. It was a Necronomicon Press production, I think.”

J-cards 3 001

J-cards 4 001

J-cards 2 001

J-cards 1 001

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